About Brent Ryan

I love Texas. And I love Texas music.  When I discovered the songwriting of Texas musicians such as Lyle Lovett, Robert Earl Keen, Guy Clark, and Townes Van Zandt, most of my old mainstream albums went back to the shelf and my speakers were filled with a different sound, one of traditional organic acoustic warmth and rich storytelling lyrics.

I want to write songs that engage you deeper than just a toe-tapping experience, although I hope that my songs are worthy of a toe-tap when called for.  I look for the balance of a melody and chorus that invite you to sing along, balanced with a deeper intellectual learning experience. A songwriting friend of mine once traveled to Nashville to network with the publishing companies. He was told, “You need to dumb down your songs a little bit, they need to be accessible to an 8th grade audience.”  I think that is an insult to you as the music listener.  There will always be music for 8th graders, but what about the music that you want to speak into your life? Do you live an 8th grade life?

It has been my honor and privilege to work hard to write songs that tell my story, and hopefully merge just a little into your lane.  Then you and I can journey along side by side and share some experiences together, laugh some, shed the occasional tear, and let the song remind us that nobody travels alone.

My debut project, “Cinnamon Pass” is a traditional 11-song album featuring original music of mine. I was motivated by good storytelling, writing songs that put me into the mind and spirit of fictional characters that had exceptional lives. Nevertheless, songs like “Free” and “Best Friend” are dangerously personal and vulnerable for me, as songwriting should be.

My second project is a five song EP called “Point A to Point B”. It is simply a collection of songs to chart my zig-zaggy evolution to a more soulful, accessible, folk/americana type of sound.  Every song on the EP is a story in my heart, less dressed up in evening cocktail clothes, and more settled into the cozy rug in front of the fireplace.

More music is to come. It may or may not sound like the past, as the past is always inseparable from the present. We can’t change who we are, and where we have come from. But no matter what tomorrow brings for me, I hope that I can continue to dig into the depths of my own mind, heart, and spirit, and give to you something of myself by which you can know and be known.

I offer you my music. and a happy toast to the song. I hope you can get bright-eyed and sing along, or close your eyes and reminisce. I hope your heavy heart becomes a little more lifted, and your wandering mind a little more settled. Enjoy the song.